Why Lacta-biotic?

Written by: Sabrina Granniss, IBCLC

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Time to read 5 min

Breastfeeding should never hurt, but sometimes, it does happen. Ideally, your baby is nursing frequently and removing colostrum effectively. The transition should be smooth and comfortable as your milk increases in volume over the first few days postpartum. Your breasts may increase in size and feel heavier, but they should not become so full of milk that they feel rock-hard and painful.  Engorgement can impact the milk's flow, making it more difficult, leading to plugged ducts and breast dysbiosis. Of course, these issues don’t just happen in the first weeks of breastfeeding; they can happen anytime we are out of balance or at any time during the months or years you breastfeed. 


Plugged ducts can happen when not enough milk is being removed during feeding or pumping. This puts pressure on the ducts and can cause inflammation and narrow the duct, making it harder for milk to pass through. More milk backs up and creates a blockage. It can feel like a hard lump under the skin and be painful. Infection can start here. If there is damage to the nipple from feeding your baby, a type of bacteria normally found on the skin called staphylococcus can get in and lead to mastitis. This can cause swelling of the breast tissue, pain, redness, and flu-like symptoms for the parent. Some people notice a decrease in their milk supply until the infection is resolved.

What probiotic strain and probiotic supplement are for breastfeeding?

L. fermentum is one probiotic strain that transfers from parent to baby in breastmilk, strengthening the baby’s immune system and offering protection against illness. (5)(9) Probiotic strains in breast milk train the baby’s gut and equip them with the bacteria to prevent illness and avoid allergies as your baby gets older. (4) In a randomized, double-blind study, L. fermentum showed babies had a 46% lower incidence rate of gastrointestinal infections,  27% less upper respiratory infections, and 30% less total infections than the control group. (10)


Lacta-biotic probiotics containing L. fermentum are like the superhero bacteria that fight against pathogens by not letting them adhere to the intestinal mucosa, leaving them nowhere to live or occupy in the gut. The balance of gut flora stays in check, and you steer clear of breast pain while improving your overall breast health and your baby's immune system. (3)  Lacta-biotic offers relief from pain and breast discomfort that can be experienced during breastfeeding by reducing a bacteria called Staphylococcus. (2)


Probiotic supplements are very safe and found to be more effective than antibiotics in treating mastitis in breastfeeding women. (1) Antibiotics can disrupt the balance of bacteria in our gut, but Lacta-biotic helps restore the balance of bacteria in our intestinal tract and can be used as an effective part of treatment for mastitis. (1) The risk of recurrence of mastitis is significantly lower after taking a probiotic like Lacta-biotic that contains L. fermentum. (1) Probiotic protection continues even after you stop taking the probiotic, as it contributes to a stronger immune system and overall gut health. (3) 

Benefits of Lacta-Biotic during pregnancy

Lacta-biotic probiotic can be taken preventatively to avoid inflammatory responses that lead to breast pain. (5) Taking Lacta-biotic in the last trimester helps reduce the risk of developing inflammation and mastitis after your baby is born. (5) Antibiotics are typically given during a cesarean section birth, and we know that antibiotic use increases the risk of developing mastitis. (11) Taking Lacta-biotic before breast pain, redness, or plugged ducts occur in the early weeks of nursing can reduce the chances of getting mastitis by up to 51%, helping to ensure comfortable continued breastfeeding. (5) 

Development of the baby’s gut microbiome

Gut health impacts the function of our brain and body, including the breast. Mothers pass their gut health on to their babies through birth and breastfeeding. Breast milk provides everything your baby needs for nutrition and developing a robust immune system. Your milk contains probiotics and Human Milk Oligosaccharides. Probiotics are healthy bacteria that establish the baby's gut microbiome and immune system. Human Milk Oligosaccharides (HMOs) are food for the beneficial flora to multiply, leaving no room for harmful bacteria to be problematic.

A probiotic-rich diet

Our diet influences the balance of our intestinal flora. (8) Remember, for probiotics to thrive and multiply, they need food. When that balance gets disrupted, it causes problems, including breast pain and mastitis. Lacta-biotic can help by restoring that balance in a safe and highly effective way. (6) Eating fermented and fiber-rich foods boosts your overall nutrition. 

Prebiotic foods:

  • Oats
  • Bananas
  • Onions and leeks
  • Avocado
  • Asparagus
  • Garlic
  • Legumes

Probiotic foods:

  • Miso
  • Sauerkraut
  • Tempeh
  • Kefir
  • Real refrigerated pickles or other pickled veggies

Eating foods that are fermented and fiber-rich foods boosts your overall nutrition. Supplements and high-quality probiotics can help jump-start your gut health and relieve symptoms caused by imbalances. Be prepared for breastfeeding by taking Lacta-Biotic at the end of your pregnancy. At every stage in the postpartum period, Lacta-biotic can help resolve dysbiosis, improve breast health during lactation, and offer benefits to your baby so they are healthy and thriving. The many benefits for you and your baby will allow you to avoid breast discomfort, keep your baby healthy, and enjoy your breastfeeding journey.

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Footnotes

  1. Arroyo, Martin, Maldonado, et al. Treatment of infectious mastitis during lactation: Antibiotics versus Oral Administration of Lactobacilli Isolated from Breast Milk. Clinical Infectious Diseases 2010;50(12): 1551-1558
  2. 5-Lc40 Chest pain during breastfeeding.pdf
  3. Olivares, Diaz-Ropero, Gomez et al. The consumption of two new probiotic strains, Lactobacillus gasseri CECT 5714 and Lactobacillus coryniformis CECT 5711, boosts the immune system of healthy humans, International Microbiology (2006) 9:47-52
  4. Martinez-Canavate et al. A Probiotic dairy product containing L. gasseri CECT5714 and L. coryniformis CECT5711 induces immunological changes in children suffering allergy, Pediatric Allergy and Immunology 2009
  5. Hurtao et al. Oral Administration to Nursing Women of Lactobacillus fermentum CECT5716 Prevents Lactational Mastitis Development: A Randomized Controlled Trial, Breastfeeding medicine, Volume 12, Number 4, 2017
  6. Lara-Villoslada et al. Safety Assessment of Lactobacillus fermentum CECT5716, a probiotic strain isolated from human milk, Journal of Dairy Research 2009 76 216-221
  7. World Health Organization, Mastitis Causes and Management, 2000
  8. . Ding, C. Qi, Z.Yang, S. Jiang, Y. Bi, J. Lai and J. Sun, Food Funct., 2019, DOI: 10.1039/C8FO02182
  9. Maldonado et al. Evaluation of the safety, tolerance and efficacy of 1-year consumption of infant formula supplemented with Lactobacillus fermentum CECT5716 Lc40 or Bifidobacteriu, breve CECT7263: a randomized controlled trial, BMC Pediatrics 2019 19:361
  10. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21873895/
  11. https://journal.barpetaogs.co.in/pdfs/06.pdf

References

Arroyo, Martin, Maldonado, et al. Treatment of infectious mastitis during lactation: Antibiotics versus Oral Administration of Lactobacilli Isolated from Breast Milk. Clinical Infectious Diseases 2010;50(12): 1551-1558

Olivares, Diaz-Ropero, Gomez et al. The consumption of two new probiotic strains, Lactobacillus gasseri CECT 5714 and Lactobacillus coryniformis CECT 5711, boosts the immune system of healthy humans, International Microbiology (2006) 9:47-52

Martinez-Canavate et al. A Probiotic dairy product containing L. gasseri CECT5714 and L. coryniformis CECT5711 induces immunological changes in children suffering allergy, Pediatric Allergy and Immunology 2009

Hurtao et al. Oral Administration to Nursing Women of Lactobacillus fermentum CECT5716 Prevents Lactational Mastitis Development: A Randomized Controlled Trial, Breastfeeding medicine, Volume 12, Number 4, 2017

Lara-Villoslada et al. Safety Assessment of Lactobacillus fermentum CECT5716, a probiotic strain isolated from human milk, Journal of Dairy Research 2009 76 216-221

World Health Organization, Mastitis Causes and Management, 2000

Ding, C. Qi, Z.Yang, S. Jiang, Y. Bi, J. Lai and J. Sun, Food Funct., 2019, DOI: 10.1039/C8FO02182

Maldonado et al. Evaluation of the safety, tolerance and efficacy of 1-year consumption of infant formula supplemented with Lactobacillus fermentum CECT5716 Lc40 or Bifidobacteriu, breve CECT7263: a randomized controlled trial, BMC Pediatrics 2019 19:361

https://ndnr.com/womens-health/lactobacillus-fermentum-new-applications-for-mastitis-infant-immunity/


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9024158/